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Sunday, February 12, 2017

Hidden Figures


Ignorance is not bliss and Mrs. T and I came out of Mayo Clinic after 2 ½ days  better informed if not blissful.  That took us to our favorite Chinese buffet and a movie.  Again after the movie we felt much better informed about an important part of American history.  The Space Race, though we didn’t feel blissful about it either…..
 
 Hidden Figures is not a blissful  kind of film: It’s a story of brilliance, but not of ego. It’s a story of struggle and willpower, but not of individual glory. Set in 1960s Virginia, the film centers on three pioneering African American women whose calculations for NASA were integral to several historic space missions, including John Glenn’s successful orbit of the Earth. These women—Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson, and Dorothy Vaughan—were superlative mathematicians and engineers despite starting their careers in segregation-era America and facing discrimination at home, at school, and at work.

 Just the fact that our collective culture highlights virtually zip about this platoon of brilliant, dedicated, overworked, under-appreciated, and until recently, never celebrated African-American women who functioned as NASA’s “living computers” to make it possible for Alan Shepherd, Gus Grissom and John Glenn to become national heroes is as humiliating as it is mind-boggling. This is
especially for those of us who grew up witnessing the birth, trials and eventual triumph of our Gemini and Apollo Space Programs.    Yes, Hidden Figures is well worth seeing…..:)

15 comments:

Anvilcloud said...

I read a good review from another blogger too. I'll keep it in mind.

Are you guys okay?

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi TB - it is definitely on my to see list as soon as it gets down here ... so am delighted to see another good review ... thanks - cheers and I too hope all is well ... Hilary

Out on the prairie said...

Want to go in the next few days.Went to La La Land last a charming musical love story.

Vicki said...

Saw this film with my husband this month. Good film with excellent acting. I was a young girl when the Space Race began and was in junior high and high school in the 1960's. Math wasn't my favorite subject. I remember getting behind in algebra I as a freshman (I managed a "C") and then flunking geometry as a sophomore. I don't remember any encouragement from counselors or parents to excel in math. I loved reading and the arts a lot more. My mom was taking a course in COBOL at the community college but I think she dropped out. She told me she thought I would be a good engineer. But I had a "math block" and without any encouragement, my dream to be a geologist was dropped and I majored in "Sociology". This movie was great wit a story I wish had been told when I was a teenager.

DJan said...

I went online after I saw and enjoyed this movie to find out how much was real and how much Hollywood hype. Imagine my surprise to find that it pretty much was all just as it happened. Katherine Johnson also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2015! She's still alive at 98. :-)

Red said...

I've heard about these women and heard an interview with one of them. she was very well spoken and not bitter about the situation.

Far Side of Fifty said...

They were pioneering women who never made the history books. Glad you enjoyed the movie, we will watch it on Netflix someday. You are lucky to live near Mayo, that is a great place and I am sorry you are not blissful...but being informed is a good thing. :) Is it spring there yet...it looks to be a wonderful weekend:)

Arkansas Patti said...

I am sorry your trip to Mayo was not blissful. Hopefully being informed will be helpful.
I have not heard one person that wasn't totally impressed with this movie. I love that the young girls today can see that math is not unattainable for them. I grew up with that stereotype and wish I had know of such marvelous women.

Bubba Muntzer said...

I myself have wondered how they do the calculations for that, shooting something up and at an angle and at a velocity and direction so as to get it to continually fall around the earth, basically. It's perhaps like throwing a baseball a thousand miles and hitting a strike zone that's moving away from you except harder. It must require a kind of math and math proficiency I can't even imagine.

A very inventive review, too! Thank you.

PS: 10,000 lakes AND the Mayo Clinic. What have Minnesotans done to deserve that? I wish you well.

Sally Wessely said...

You did a great job on commenting on this movie. The movie was sobering and inspirational at the same time. My best to you and Mrs. T.

Cynthia said...

I've been wanting to see this. Thanks for you review. I hope your news from Mayo's wasn't bad news.c

Shady Gardener said...

I haven't yet seen this... but really want to! I am glad you posted the review.
Hope things are going well with the two of you!

Jenn Jilks said...

At least they are starting to tell these stories!

LL Cool Joe said...

Definitely a film I want to see. Thanks for the review and your comment on my blog.

Linda said...

Yes, I'm hearing good things about it.